Qifa Nabki Comments

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News and commentary from the Levant
Updated: 4 hours 32 min ago

Comment on Of Maps and Men by Jim Reilly

6 hours 30 min ago

ICYMI: a column by Rami Khoury that speaks of the “thin nature of citizen allegiance to the contemporary centralized Arab state,” and attributes this to bad governance:

http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Opinion/Columnist/2014/Aug-20/267750-arabs-face-a-deep-crisis-of-statehood.ashx#axzz3AvOa083T

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Maverick

6 hours 42 min ago

BV,

If you’re looking back a thousand years, which region didn’t experience constant warfare? You make it sound like the ME’erner is doomed to perpetual conflict because it is etched in his DNA.

The constant struggles were never about borders but ideologies. It’s too bad that so often wars fought on ideological premises end up being sectarian in nature.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Bad Vilbel

9 hours 48 min ago

No one wants to comment on my response above?

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by AIG

11 hours 59 min ago

And to keep the “good” news coming:
1) As much as the current situation in Egypt is beneficial for Israel, it ain’t over yet there. There will be serious unrest in the next few years for all the same underlying reasons.
2) Lebanon is in grave danger from the Syrian refugees. In 10 years give or take, the current children and teenagers will have grown up much of their life in Lebanon and will make demands on the Lebanese state. This will lead to a civil war. I don’t know what the solution is, but Lebanon has to somehow deal with the issue if it wants to survive in its current form.
3) Jordan is still very shaky but given the example of the catastrophe next door in Syria, there will be a strong reluctance by the population to risk instability.

But there is some actual good news. It looks like the people of the middle east are finding out rather quickly that political Islam is not a good alternative so the transition from political Islam to other options will take much less time than I thought. It was hard to imagine that the Islamists would be so ineffectual or brutal. The Egyptians got fed up with the Muslim Brotherhood in a very short time. The downside is that the only alternative so far is authoritarian regimes or deadlock that cannot deal with the underlying problems such as population growth in Egypt or political reform in Lebanon.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Akbar Palace

14 hours 18 min ago

Looks like AIG had it pegged back in 2009. Can Brown offer him an honorary degree in ME Prophecy?

t is time we bomb their strong holds in Raqqa and throughout Syria.

Tamer K,

Sure, you have my permission, but just make sure it’s done “proportionally” and that you don’t employ “collective punishment”.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by tamer k

15 hours 38 min ago

Watching the video of the gruesome and barbaric beheading of James Wright Foley was frightening, but what was also chilling is the impeccable English the ISIS thug spoke. Disgusting, we can’t bomb them in Iraq and allow them to flourish in Syria. It is time we bomb their strong holds in Raqqa and throughout Syria.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Qifa Nabki

15 hours 51 min ago

From a comment by AIG in 2009:

“There will be wars in the middle-east in the next few years. But they will be CIVIL wars inside the Arab countries. Both Egypt and Syria are unsustainable entities, perhaps also Jordan. The combination of oil prices, the depression, lack of water and the crazy population growth will lead to a big explosion in the middle-east. This is really not in our own hands. We should wait patiently and see what emerges afterwards. This process may take 20 years to play out but it is NOT in our hands to influence. We are neither smart enough or strong enough and also we do not care enough. We have to mind our own very narrow interests and let the chips fall where they may.”

Yikes…

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Ray

Wed, 2014-08-20 02:13

My special dedication to my friend.

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Comment on The Rolling Stones of Morocco: Nass el-Ghiwane by The Ustad

Wed, 2014-08-20 01:28

What the hell does an article about Nass El Ghiwane have to do with any of these comments?

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Gabriel

Tue, 2014-08-19 11:32

Lally.

Lol.

Brilliant. Just brilliant.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Mustap

Tue, 2014-08-19 07:55

Maverick,

To be honest with you, I never heard of Yazidis before the recent events. In Iraq, at least before ISIS, they had their own pilgrimage town and places of worship. So they were practicing in the open.

Due to their very limited numbers, they may get looked upon awkwardly in a place other than Iraq. But, in this case they may have to resort to Taqiyya. And yes agree, on the surface it is assimilation. But assimilation as it was enforced in previous centuries in some parts of the world meant total melt down. Taqiyya is endemic to Muslim majority countries. And it is not confined to matters of faith only.

I also wouldn’t expect any of the so-called satan worshipers would be free to practice even through Taqiyya, in case they get discovered, I’m sure they’ll be dealt with harshly. I heard of one getting arrested recently in some Gulf country.

I don’t think there’s a problem with the rest of the other recognized non-Islamic faiths.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Maverick

Tue, 2014-08-19 07:30

AIG,

You can hardly call that a Nation-State, it was a more a statelet, territory, canton. I think it was also a reaction to the French authorities. A snippet in Wikipedia is hardly a good starting point.

See article below;

http://english.al-akhbar.com/node/20452

Mustap,

‘Taqqiya’ I believe is concealment through assimilation (on the surface anyway) and try asking the Yazidis if they can practice their ‘spiritualities’ in any Arab country even before the advent of ISIS.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Mustap

Tue, 2014-08-19 06:10

Maverick,

Minorities and non-Muslims can practice their ‘spiritualities’ in any Arab country without resorting to ‘taqqiya’, which to my knowledge means concealement and not assimilation.

You would object to my blanket statement above by citing Saudi Arabia. OK, you can do that. But, there are reasons for it. Saudi Arabia is a tribal society and 100% Muslim since the early days. You may say, there are millions of migrant workers who are non-Muslims. True, but they are in the Kingdom under a contract which they understand very clearly before they leave their home countries. They know they can never become citizens, they cannot upset the prevailing customs, and they have to go back to their countries of origin when their sevices are no longer required. In return, they are usually compensated with very lucrative salaries and benefits.

There is a similar practice in almost all the huge multinational conglomerates operating throughout the world, companies that employ hundreds of thousands of workers. In addition to their regular staff (which you may think of as citizens of the company because they usually retire from the company. They’re there for life), these companies rely on a huge pool of contractors who provide essential services to the company. These contractors also get the lucrative contracts with huge immediate compensations, but they don’t get the long term benefits of the regular staff (the citizens). The regular staff usually make far less than the contractors in terms of immediate compensations. It’s not exactly the same when it comes to spirituality, but there are millions others throughout the world who would be more than eager to sign the contract with the Saudis and live with the inconvenience of taqqiya.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by AIG

Tue, 2014-08-19 05:57

Maverik,

Just nonsense:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabal_Druze_State

If you don’t think some of the Christians in Lebanon believe there could be either a completely independent Christian country or at the very least a Christian state that is part of a federation, you haven’t been talking to any LF’er lately. The other Christians would jump at the option of a Christian state if they thought it were viable. It would be near impossible to breakup Lebanon now.

All what you said, was said about the Jews for years by the way. Boy were many people surprised to see Jews with a state.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Akbar Palace

Tue, 2014-08-19 04:06

QN,

RGIII isn’t going to last in the NFL if he continues running with the ball.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Maverick

Tue, 2014-08-19 03:36

AIG,

Not to throw a spanner in the works, but I don’t think minorities creating their own Nation-States would be feasible. Not only are they too tiny to administer such a grand task, they also have their long lasting beliefs that dictate a ‘taqqiya’ or assimilation within the larger nation. Groups such as the Alawites, Ismaelis, Druze, Yazidis and other sufi-esque minorities would prefer to have an autonomous community within the larger multi-ethnic community. For starters, they can practise their spirituality without having to deal with governance, administration and the burdens of a Nation-State deflecting their responsibilities in the spiritual realm. Also, politically, they set themselves up for antagonism and hostility as they are now isolated in one entity. You also have the ancient Christian minorities who might have similar tendencies.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Qifa Nabki

Tue, 2014-08-19 03:29

I deny nothing and confirm nothing. I am going to watch football.

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by AIG

Tue, 2014-08-19 03:11

QN,

Do you deny the fact that Israel and Lebanon are similar in size and population?
What kind of excuse is size?

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Comment on Of Maps and Men by Qifa Nabki

Tue, 2014-08-19 03:01

In the meantime, turn your thoughts to this odd photograph.

http://elaph.mobi/news/932750/

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